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PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 2021 7:59 am 
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Just continuing to see what I can get away with using LumaFusion, this time on a Mac M1. While the results aren’t perfect, it’s all very promising. Here’s the blurb from my YouTube descriptions, although the first video explains it all.

Cheers,
Dave.

This is an example of a workflow I'm trying to use for HDMI capturing HDR gameplay from the Sony PS5 using the Atomos Ninja V and editing the HDR footage in LumaFusion and then exporting a HDR MP4 from LumaFusion for uploading to YouTube.

While this workflow isn't quite there just yet, these results are very encouraging. This video example is good for seeing what the video quality and gameplay graphics of the PS5 are like in HDR edited in LumaFusion. Here's the description and link from the video on my main channel that shows and explains the workflow.

https://youtu.be/WB6cvlr18HE

In this video I'm showing a HDR capture, edit and YouTube upload that isn't quite working fully just yet. Although the basics of this workflow may be interesting to anyone using LumaFusion, Sony PS5 or Atomos Ninja 5.

While this workflow was initially done to test BlackMagic Design's DaVinci Resolve, I thought that I would try it with LumaFusion.

The workflow.

The Sony PS5 is playing Call of Duty Warzone in HDR 4K 60FPS, or more precisely, 4K UHD 3840x2160 resolution at a frame rate of 59.95 frames per second. To all intent and purpose, HDR 4K 60 FPS.

The gameplay output from the PS5 is recorded using an Atomos Ninja 5, which is recording HDR 4K UHD 59.94FPS using ProRes 422 HQ which is 1768Mb/s and 10 Bit.

This HDR recording from the Ninja is then imported into a Mac M1 computer, for this example I'm using the MacBook Air M1 2020.

And finally the video editing software I'm using is LumaFusion by Luma Touch.

Inside LumaFusion I'm using a HDR project for editing the video capture file. Which is wide gamut HDR HDR10 PQ.

The final export from LumaFusion is H.265 MP4 with the same wide gamut HDR HDR10 PQ settings to match the project and timeline settings.

I've got to be honest and say that my guess is that LumaFusion is inserting metadata into the output H.265 MP4 HDR video export file. Or maybe the colour space and gamut settings simply hint to the playback device/target that the file is HDR10 PQ. In any event, YouTube does indeed recognise the file as HDR and produces two sets of dynamic range encodings, one HDR for HDR compliant playback devices and a set of SDR standard dynamic range rec.709 encodes for the vast majority of playback devices.

Like I've said. This workflow isn't complete as I'm having audio issues in LumaFusion. This is most certainly not a criticism as I'm simply stunned by what LumaFusion is capable of on Apple Silicon M1 Mac computers and its ability to not only edit ProRes on Mac M1 but to also properly handle ProRes 422 HQ HDR.

As soon as I have a final, solid workflow for this type of editing and HDR YouTube exporting with LumaFusion, I will do a workflow example.

For now, here's the 30 second HDR export example on my gaming channel www.TheGameThing.com

https://youtu.be/TNQknwtRSGs


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 2021 5:43 pm 
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Quote:
The gameplay output from the PS5 is recorded using an Atomos Ninja 5, which is recording HDR 4K UHD 59.94FPS using ProRes 422 HQ which is 1768Mb/s and 10 Bit.
Sorry this is beyond my experience but does the term HDR really apply to a screen recording device? Isn’t it a way of extending the sensitivity of a camera to real world light levels by blending shots at different exposures. How does this apply to a screen I’m wondering?

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 2021 10:02 pm 
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Quote:
Quote:
The gameplay output from the PS5 is recorded using an Atomos Ninja 5, which is recording HDR 4K UHD 59.94FPS using ProRes 422 HQ which is 1768Mb/s and 10 Bit.
Sorry this is beyond my experience but does the term HDR really apply to a screen recording device? Isn’t it a way of extending the sensitivity of a camera to real world light levels by blending shots at different exposures. How does this apply to a screen I’m wondering?
Hi Mark.

The easiest way to think about HDR is in terms of maximum brightness. The lowest brightness level to the maximum brightness level is what’s called the dynamic range. It’s similar to audio where the lowest level to the maximum level is also dynamic range.

This is a simple explanation, things such as colour are also effected because the luma and chroma characteristics/levels of any range are both increased when the dynamic range is increased.

When you increase the bit depth you also add and increase more/higher values, the more/higher values you have the greater/wider the expression of dynamic range.

When you are at 8bit you can have a value of anywhere between 0 to 255. In this instance 0 is actually a value and therefore gives you 256 options. When you go to 10bit you may think that it doesn’t sound that more than 8 but in binary terms those extra 2 bits add a lot more values. 10bit gives you values between 0 and 1023, which is 1024 options.

With 1024 options per colour channel, Red, Blue, Green (RGB) the possible combination of unique colours is increased to over one billion, as opposed to just under 17 million for an 8bit representation. This higher resolution, in simple terms, equates to dynamic range, or the ability to have more colours when talking video.

For this to all work in video, everything has to be compatible. Be that the sensor of a camera, digitally/computer generated colours, the recording/storing of the information and also the monitor to view them on. So as you can see it’s not really a way to increase sensitivity of a camera. Although, it does in a way have the effect of simulating real world light levels as you say.

Mixing multiple exposures is sort of HDR but only in the sense that you are balancing shadows and highlights to create an exposure that’s got the best bits of what any single exposure can have. Any one exposure in a multi exposure set can still only have a value that is dictated by its bit depth, as is the same for the blended/mixed version.

When shooting with a high enough dynamic range you can basically capture a lot more detail/information in a single exposure.

There’s also other concerns such as colour space, gamma, gamut etc. and possibly to a lesser degree chroma sampling. But the easiest way to visualise/think about HDR is basing it on the levels of brightness, or an increased range of brightness.

If you’re interested in such things a good place to start is understanding how numbers and values are represented and stored in traditional computing. If you do a Google search for ‘Binary Value’ you should find something quickly that explains what a bit value is and how multiple bits very quickly help to express large numbers/values. These binary values and bits are represented as 0 or 1, or off and on. It’s a very convenient way for a computer system to deal with numbers, especially large numbers, without having to write a large number in the way that we humans recognise numbers.

I was around during the transition from analogue to digital audio recording when I used to produce music and had to learn/understand how sampling worked, so the transition to digital video/film was a very similar one. Interestingly, or not :) I started in digital video with some of the early commercially available analogue to digital video capture cards. This was when companies like Fast and Pinnacle where a big deal and recording single field (from interlaced) SD signals was the future of digital video. And now you have inexpensive software like LumaFusion that can edit 8K on a production studio that fits in your pocket :)

Cheers,
Dave.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2021 1:33 am 
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Thanks Dave for the comprehensive reply. I don’t think I have to worry about it compared to the humble storytelling in my videos :D .

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2021 1:37 pm 
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Quote:
Thanks Dave for the comprehensive reply. I don’t think I have to worry about it compared to the humble storytelling in my videos :D .
To be honest, Mark. I don’t really care for HDR myself for shooting video and it most certainly doesn’t make you a better storyteller. I don’t mind playing with it for game stuff but it’s simply not a practical format for widespread video consumption.

It is very interesting, just like all video tech is but the bottom line is that it’s a very small minority of people who can even view HDR and then you’ve got a bunch of different standards on top of that.

The real point of this video was just to show people how mad LumaFusion is and how insane its price is for what it can do. The only reason I would buy a video camera that could do HDR would be because there’d be other functions on the camera that I’d use and HDR would just be a function that the camera would have.

I would always put storytelling ahead of technology any day.

Cheers,
Dave.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2021 2:02 am 
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TVs and monitors have to catch up, but most recent quality phones and tablets are HDR compliant.... such as our Apple devices.

It's good to be ready.

I've taken "flat" 8bit footage and stretched the dynamic range out on a 10bit timeline and it actually looked nice.

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Lumafusion on 2020 iPad Pro (with FCPXML export)
Davinci Resolve Studio on M1 MBP
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